Soho Square, London in 1700

Scanned from ‘Old and New London – Its History, its people and its places’, published by Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co. 1878.

Built in the late 1670s, Soho Square was in its early years one of the most fashionable places to live in London. It was originally called King’s Square, for King Charles II. A statue of Charles II was carved by Danish sculptor Caius Gabriel Cibber in 1681 and placed at the center of the Square. By the early 19th century, the statue was described as being ‘in a most wretched mutilated state; and the inscriptions on the base of the pedestal quite illegible’. In 1875, it was removed during alterations in the square by T. Blackwell, of Crosse and Blackwell, the condiment firm, who gave it for safekeeping to his friend, artist Frederick Goodall, with the intention that it might be restored. Goodall placed the statue on an island in his lake at Grim’s Dyke, where it remained when dramatist W. S. Gilbert purchased the property in 1890, and there it stayed after Gilbert’s death in 1911. In her will, Lady Gilbert directed that the statue be returned, and it was restored to Soho Square in 1938.

7 Comments

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *